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Posts tagged science.

I think engineering is, in a way, based on exploration. It’s always about trying to ask questions, about being curious, being creative. 
— Dr. Albert Yu-Min Lin, National Geographic emerging explorer and UC San Diego research scientist.

Full story: Modern-Day Explorer Goes High-Tech Out of Respect — National Geographic, academia provide outlet for adventurer to follow his passion.

I think engineering is, in a way, based on exploration. It’s always about trying to ask questions, about being curious, being creative.

— Dr. Albert Yu-Min Lin, National Geographic emerging explorer and UC San Diego research scientist.

Full story: Modern-Day Explorer Goes High-Tech Out of RespectNational Geographic, academia provide outlet for adventurer to follow his passion.

+ 
I am an applied mathematician by training and an engineer by genetics, following in my father’s and two grandfathers’ footsteps.
— Karl Kempf, Intel Fellow and director of decision engineering, Intel Architecture Group

Kempf is Intel’s Math Master who fires up exotic mathematical models to figure out all kinds of stuff — such as where product engineers can do us the most good, or how to manage the valuable IP blocks in system-on-a-chip (SoC) products. And Kempf helps figure out — often amidst hundreds of competing ideas — where budget dollars would best be spent.

I am an applied mathematician by training and an engineer by genetics, following in my father’s and two grandfathers’ footsteps.

— Karl Kempf, Intel Fellow and director of decision engineering, Intel Architecture Group

Kempf is Intel’s Math Master who fires up exotic mathematical models to figure out all kinds of stuff — such as where product engineers can do us the most good, or how to manage the valuable IP blocks in system-on-a-chip (SoC) products. And Kempf helps figure out — often amidst hundreds of competing ideas — where budget dollars would best be spent.

Posted 1 year ago. Tagged with mathmatics, math, Intel, science, numbers man, chip design, technology, Karl Kempf, .
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Camera: Nikon D3s
Aperture: f/3.5
Exposure: 1/200th
Focal Length: 28mm
Exif “When Hawking received it, he was pleased, honored and interested in how it was made,” said Martin Curley, vice president of Intel Labs Europe, who presented Hawking with a one-of-a-kind wafer as a 71st birthday gift. The 300-millimeter silicon wafer that read “Happy Birthday Stephen Hawking” 100 times in letters 10 times smaller than the width of a human hair. The letters were etched on the wafer at Intel’s Fab D1C in Hillsboro, Ore. employing the same 32-nanometer technology used for Intel smartphone chips.

Hawking said there are a lot of plaques in the halls of his research facility, but this one is going straight to his office, according to David Fleming, manager of the Intel Innovation Open Lab in Ireland. “He also joked that his initials already appear in massive galactic graffiti visible in the afterglow of the Big Bang, referencing a NASA image from 2010, but now his name exists in the smallest of dimensions,” said Fleming.
The full story: Stephen Hawking Celebrates with Silicon.

“When Hawking received it, he was pleased, honored and interested in how it was made,” said Martin Curley, vice president of Intel Labs Europe, who presented Hawking with a one-of-a-kind wafer as a 71st birthday gift. The 300-millimeter silicon wafer that read “Happy Birthday Stephen Hawking” 100 times in letters 10 times smaller than the width of a human hair. The letters were etched on the wafer at Intel’s Fab D1C in Hillsboro, Ore. employing the same 32-nanometer technology used for Intel smartphone chips.

Hawking said there are a lot of plaques in the halls of his research facility, but this one is going straight to his office, according to David Fleming, manager of the Intel Innovation Open Lab in Ireland. “He also joked that his initials already appear in massive galactic graffiti visible in the afterglow of the Big Bang, referencing a NASA image from 2010, but now his name exists in the smallest of dimensions,” said Fleming.

The full story: Stephen Hawking Celebrates with Silicon.

Posted 1 year ago. Tagged with Hawking, Technology, Science, Space, Computer Wafer, .

No Nation Has Monopoly on Great Ideas (by IntelFreePress)

DARPA director of information innovation Dan Kaufman talks about competition keeping America focused on being a leader in global technology innovation and the need for creating breakthroughs that can inspire a generation as Sputnik and the moon landing did. Kaufman spoke with Intel Free Press after his on-stage conversation with John Markoff of the New York Times at a Computer History Museum event.

This video describes the software that guided the U.S. space agency’s Mars Science Laboratory to its bulls-eye landing on Mars was written by Wind River, an Intel subsidiary. Wind River Senior Technologist Mike Deliman talks about the software that operated the craft’s controls from its liftoff in November 2011, to its descent in a swirl of red dust at 10:21 p.m. (PDT) Sunday.

“Wind River’s VxWorks is the software platform that controls the execution of all of Curiosity’s functions — from managing avionics to collecting science data and sending the experimental results back to NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory on Earth using satellite telemetry,” said Mile Deliman, senior member of the technical staff at Wind River.

Posted 1 year ago. Tagged with NASA, Mars Curiosity, Space, Science, Software, Wind River, Robotics, Technology, .

DARPA’s Dan Kaufman, director of information innovation and author of a textbook on intellectual property law, talks the role of IP:

If you create a great product, you’re going to be out in front of people and you’re going to do just fine. There’s nothing wrong with companies wanting patents and to be protected, but I think that if the majority of your efforts are focused on [protecting IP], it’s almost the beginning of the decay of your company. You need to focus your bright brains on making the next incredible product. The idea is, go make cool stuff and lawyers can do the lawyer thing.

Riding a resurgence of recognition thanks to the Hollywood movie “Red Tails,” Ben Berry spoke with Intel Free Press following his presentation and book signing at Intel’s Hillsboro, Ore. facility Wednesday. He discussed not only his days as a Tuskegee Airman during World War II, but also his work on NASA’s Apollo spacecraft and his current project designing a vertical takeoff and landing craft with his son.

As one of the first African-American aviators in the U.S. armed forces, “Flaps” Berry said he overcame adversity and racial bigotry during training and air combat to become what he is today. The 87-year-old received the Congressional Gold Medal of Honor and pursued a career in mechanical and aerospace engineering after devoting years of service to his country.

Berry’s historic military career began when he was drafted at age 18, but his passion for engineering can be traced to childhood.

"When I was about 12 years old my aunt gave me a dog-eared engineering handbook and I saw all these formulas in it I couldn’t understand," he said in an exclusive interview. "Over the years as I advanced in school, I’d look at the book often, trying to know everything that was in it, but it wasn’t until I graduated from USC when I understood the entire book. It was a personal accomplishment that began when I was a child."

Some of what he learned in that engineering manual came in handy when he worked on U.S. Army airplanes, particularly on the B-25 bomber. Preferring to fly planes instead of fixing them, Berry asked for a change of duty and got his wish.

"I always wanted to fly planes, even as a child, and I was so excited when given the chance," Berry said.

Riding a resurgence of recognition thanks to the Hollywood movie “Red Tails,” Ben Berry spoke with Intel Free Press following his presentation and book signing at Intel’s Hillsboro, Ore. facility Wednesday. He discussed not only his days as a Tuskegee Airman during World War II, but also his work on NASA’s Apollo spacecraft and his current project designing a vertical takeoff and landing craft with his son.

As one of the first African-American aviators in the U.S. armed forces, “Flaps” Berry said he overcame adversity and racial bigotry during training and air combat to become what he is today. The 87-year-old received the Congressional Gold Medal of Honor and pursued a career in mechanical and aerospace engineering after devoting years of service to his country.

Berry’s historic military career began when he was drafted at age 18, but his passion for engineering can be traced to childhood.

"When I was about 12 years old my aunt gave me a dog-eared engineering handbook and I saw all these formulas in it I couldn’t understand," he said in an exclusive interview. "Over the years as I advanced in school, I’d look at the book often, trying to know everything that was in it, but it wasn’t until I graduated from USC when I understood the entire book. It was a personal accomplishment that began when I was a child."

Some of what he learned in that engineering manual came in handy when he worked on U.S. Army airplanes, particularly on the B-25 bomber. Preferring to fly planes instead of fixing them, Berry asked for a change of duty and got his wish.

"I always wanted to fly planes, even as a child, and I was so excited when given the chance," Berry said.

Posted 2 years ago. Tagged with NASA, aerospace, science, engineering, Ben Berry, technology, innovation, innovators, .
+ The computer technology behind NASA’s latest high definition photograph of Earth.

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center scientist Norman Kuring, who created the images, said that he did his data crunching on a custom-built 64-bit Linux desktop system powered by an Intel Core 2 Quad CPU. “It’s just a grey box by my desk,” he said.

Kuring says his Intel-based machine began chewing through the tens of gigabytes of raw satellite data for each image when he went home to eat dinner. About 4 hours later the job was done.

Full story: Mother Earth in High-Def 

The computer technology behind NASA’s latest high definition photograph of Earth.

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center scientist Norman Kuring, who created the images, said that he did his data crunching on a custom-built 64-bit Linux desktop system powered by an Intel Core 2 Quad CPU. “It’s just a grey box by my desk,” he said.

Kuring says his Intel-based machine began chewing through the tens of gigabytes of raw satellite data for each image when he went home to eat dinner. About 4 hours later the job was done.

Full story: Mother Earth in High-Def 

Posted 2 years ago. Tagged with technology, photography, computers, NASA, science, space science, space, Earth, .
New techniques, including advances in brain scans, are helping to reveal the hidden anatomy of brain wiring and giving scientists a new understanding of how thoughts, memories and emotions are formed. WSJ’s Robert Lee Hotz reports.
Implications for the ability of computers to match human intelligence.

New techniques, including advances in brain scans, are helping to reveal the hidden anatomy of brain wiring and giving scientists a new understanding of how thoughts, memories and emotions are formed. WSJ’s Robert Lee Hotz reports.

Implications for the ability of computers to match human intelligence.

Posted 2 years ago. Tagged with Brain, science, human intelligence, Neuroscience, computers, technology, tech, .

From screen future to the four stages of new technology evolution, Brian David Johnson is not so much a trend spotter as he is a guy who sees science fiction becoming science fact. 

In this story for Slate, he explains how society moves from fear to acceptance of smartphones, computers, and other advances.

Posted 2 years ago. Tagged with science, science fiction, technology, tech, futurist, future, Intel, .

Professor Stephen Hawking and highlights from his 70th birthday symposium at Cambridge University, The State of the Universe. And a look at Stephen Hawking’s New PC.

Posted 2 years ago. Tagged with stephen hawking, universe, science, space science, computers, technology, tech, .

Making hexapod robots using smart designs and built-in intelligence — Morphex changes from globe into crab and teaching a spider to dance.

Posted 2 years ago. Tagged with robots, hexapod, science, technology, .
+ No real Artificial Intelligence in next 40 years, reports Ubergizmo, after talking with Intel 4004 microprocessor designer Federico Faggin at a 40th Anniversary of the Microprocessor event in San Francisco. 
After studying human conscious for many years as a passion, Faggin is starting a foundation that will use computers to map a better understanding of the human brain really works. 
Even if quantum computers arrive, they will still no match for human intelligence, says Faggin.

No real Artificial Intelligence in next 40 years, reports Ubergizmo, after talking with Intel 4004 microprocessor designer Federico Faggin at a 40th Anniversary of the Microprocessor event in San Francisco. 

After studying human conscious for many years as a passion, Faggin is starting a foundation that will use computers to map a better understanding of the human brain really works.

Even if quantum computers arrive, they will still no match for human intelligence, says Faggin.

Technological singularity spurs lively discussions that lead to the immense power that comes from human creativity. Newton’s F = ma, his theory for how planets revolved around the sun, was not created by a computer.

This video was captured during a 40th anniversary of the microprocessor celebration, where the audience asked tech industry experts what they thought about the concept of “technological singularity,” a term coined by science fiction writer Vernon Vinge and popularized by futurist Ray Kurzweil, who describe the possibility of greater-than-human intelligence through technological means.

Federico Faggin designer of the world’s first microprocessor, Thom Sawicki of Intel Labs and Intel Fellow Shekhar Borkar dispute the real possibility, saying that computers will not surpass human intelligence.