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Posts tagged intel.
+ Silicon Valley technology companies back bid to win Super Bowl 50 in 2016, which would be played in the new, high tech Levi’s Stadium, new home of the San Francisco 49ers.

Silicon Valley technology companies back bid to win Super Bowl 50 in 2016, which would be played in the new, high tech Levi’s Stadium, new home of the San Francisco 49ers.

USB Co-inventor Reinventing the PC (by IntelFreePress)

Posted 12 months ago. Tagged with USB, Technology, Invention, Inventor, Innovation, PC, computer, Ajay Bhatt, Intel, USB plug, .
"A few years ago, he [Ken Anderson, Intel ethnographer] conducted an ethnographic study of “temporality,” about the perception of the passage and scarcity of time—noting how Americans he studied had come to perceive busy-ness and lack of time as a marker of well-being. “We found that in social interaction, virtually everyone would claim to be ‘busy,’ and that everyone close to them would be ‘busy’ too,” he told me. But in fact, coordinated studies of how these people used technology suggested that when they used their computers, they tended to do work only in short bursts of a few minutes at a time, with the rest of the time devoted to something other than what we might identify as work. “We were designing computers, and the spec at the time was to use the computer to the max for two hours,” Anderson says. “We had to make chips that would perform at that level. You don’t want them to overheat. But when we came back, we figured that we needed to rethink this, because people’s time is not quite what we imagine.” For a company that makes microchip processors, this discovery has had important consequences for how to engineer products—not only for users who constantly need high-powered computing for long durations, but for people who just think they do."

Graeme WoodAnthropology Inc.

Fascinating account of corporate anthropologists, like those working at the ReD consultancy.

(via stoweboyd)

Posted 1 year ago. Tagged with Ken Anderson, Research, Enthnography, Busy, Intel, .

Could big data lower your power bill?

Just as consumers are turning to mobile apps to track vital signs and manage their personal health, researchers believe that smart grid and sensor-based data collection technologies in homes could help people better manage their monthly utility bills. 

"The more sensors that you have in the home, the more your home begins to look like an OnStar system,” said Pecan Street Inc. CEO Brewster McCracken. “These sensors could trigger a check engine warning light for the home.”

The full interview with McCraken can be found here, where talks about how smart grid and sensor technologies  can help families curb consumer energy use.

+ 
I am an applied mathematician by training and an engineer by genetics, following in my father’s and two grandfathers’ footsteps.
— Karl Kempf, Intel Fellow and director of decision engineering, Intel Architecture Group

Kempf is Intel’s Math Master who fires up exotic mathematical models to figure out all kinds of stuff — such as where product engineers can do us the most good, or how to manage the valuable IP blocks in system-on-a-chip (SoC) products. And Kempf helps figure out — often amidst hundreds of competing ideas — where budget dollars would best be spent.

I am an applied mathematician by training and an engineer by genetics, following in my father’s and two grandfathers’ footsteps.

— Karl Kempf, Intel Fellow and director of decision engineering, Intel Architecture Group

Kempf is Intel’s Math Master who fires up exotic mathematical models to figure out all kinds of stuff — such as where product engineers can do us the most good, or how to manage the valuable IP blocks in system-on-a-chip (SoC) products. And Kempf helps figure out — often amidst hundreds of competing ideas — where budget dollars would best be spent.

Posted 1 year ago. Tagged with mathmatics, math, Intel, science, numbers man, chip design, technology, Karl Kempf, .
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Camera: Canon EOS REBEL T3i
Aperture: f/5
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When I first started working with the end customers, like HP and Compaq before the merger, they thought Intel was very arrogant. They did not like us much at all, but they had to do business with us. Now, they look at us as a business partner. When Intel started taking a ‘we’ approach and working with customers as a team. Once both sides began opening up and sharing information, we were able to help each other make better business decisions.
— Intel customer business analyst Margaret Jesus, interviewed in Intel Career Reaches Back to Different Era

When I first started working with the end customers, like HP and Compaq before the merger, they thought Intel was very arrogant. They did not like us much at all, but they had to do business with us. Now, they look at us as a business partner. When Intel started taking a ‘we’ approach and working with customers as a team. Once both sides began opening up and sharing information, we were able to help each other make better business decisions.

— Intel customer business analyst Margaret Jesus, interviewed in Intel Career Reaches Back to Different Era

Posted 1 year ago. Tagged with Intel, Career, Technology, Women in Technology, .
+ 
"Bob came to me and said, ‘How about we start a new company? My first reaction was no, I like it here. Then a couple of months later he came back and said, ‘Now that I’m leaving, how would you like to start a new company?’ It put a whole different light on the thing."
— Gordon Moore, in a new PBS documentary “American Experience: Silicon Valley” talking about Robert Noyce who encouraged Moore to leave their first start up Fairchild Semiconductor to co-found Intel Corporation

The PBS documentary looks at how a group of young transistor tweakers turned what was once futile farmland into what today is a thriving technology innovation center of the world. Here’s a look at what Intel co-founder Gordon Moore says in the documentary, set to premiere February 5:
Silicon Valley Before the Startup

"Bob came to me and said, ‘How about we start a new company? My first reaction was no, I like it here. Then a couple of months later he came back and said, ‘Now that I’m leaving, how would you like to start a new company?’ It put a whole different light on the thing."

— Gordon Moore, in a new PBS documentary “American Experience: Silicon Valley” talking about Robert Noyce who encouraged Moore to leave their first start up Fairchild Semiconductor to co-found Intel Corporation

The PBS documentary looks at how a group of young transistor tweakers turned what was once futile farmland into what today is a thriving technology innovation center of the world. Here’s a look at what Intel co-founder Gordon Moore says in the documentary, set to premiere February 5:

Silicon Valley Before the Startup

Cars Getting Smarter (by IntelFreePress)

Joint efforts by automakers and the tech industry are bringing mobile Internet experiences to new cars.

Because more cars are connecting to the Internet, drivers can get real-time, location-based services that share traffic information or stock updates while cruising down the road. Staci Palmer, general manager of the automotive solutions division at Intel, said that about 40 percent of the estimated 80 million cars shipped in 2012 had some form of in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) system. She expects that by 2020, that rate will reach 75 percent, or around 85 million IVI systems, which run computer applications for entertainment, information or Internet connectivity. This includes dashboard navigation systems, rear-seat entertainment system for playing movies or games and small devices that connect the car to local area or wide area wireless networks, allowing consumers to bring into the car mobile devices that could be safely controlled through voice commands. She said it’s essential for automakers to design these applications and services for safe driving experiences, removing distractions so drivers can stay focused on the safety of operating the car.

Before Bluetooth Had a Name

Intel’s Mr. Bluetooth - Retired chief power architect Jim Kardach recalls a 1997 assignment to design low-cost wireless into laptops, and how that led to the creation of Bluetooth technology that today allows 9 billion headsets, mobile phones, computers and other personal devices to connect wirelessly and securely.

The full story: The Man Who Named Bluetooth.

Going to Work With Laptop to Tablet Convertibles

Screen detaches from laptop to become a touchscreen tablet.

As with smartphones, tablets and Ultrabooks, employees participating in corporate Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) programs, are bound to start using convertibles at work, particularly as IT departments support the Windows 8 operating system.

Convertibles are already in the enterprise, according to David Buchholz, director of consumerization and principal engineer at Intel IT.

In Convertibles Coming to the Enterprise, Buchholz says:

I carried multiple devices and used them all separately. I now do everything I used to do with those devices all on this one. Also after getting used to the Windows 8 interface I am using touch much more on this convertible than I ever did on the traditional clamshell Ultrabook. Also, I tend to use the Windows 8 [touch] interface as my ‘consumer’ area and the traditional desktop as my ‘corporate’ workspace.”

Rob Deline of the Intel PC Client Group said, “We were looking for any sweet spots. Do end users gravitate to a certain screen size? A certain folding mechanism? Detachable vs. non-detachable? Do they prefer low weight or thinness?”
Full story 16 Ultrabook Convertible Designs Go Head to Head

Rob Deline of the Intel PC Client Group said, “We were looking for any sweet spots. Do end users gravitate to a certain screen size? A certain folding mechanism? Detachable vs. non-detachable? Do they prefer low weight or thinness?”

Full story 16 Ultrabook Convertible Designs Go Head to Head

Artist Shubhada Sahasrabudhe creates granular beauty with silicon and light.

Sand art by night and sand engineer by day, where she develops mathematical models and simulation tools as a reliability engineer for Intel’s Corporate Quality Network in Chandler, Ariz. The native of India came to the United States in 1999 to pursue a master’s degree in mechanical engineering. Upon graduating in 2001, she joined Intel, where her husband, Shridhar Bendre, is also an engineer.

Full story: Intel Engineer Express Herself Through Sand.

Posted 1 year ago. Tagged with Sand art, art, video, Intel, engineer, innovator, India, .

I’ve been watching every minute of Curiosity. What excites me is to think that I get to participate in what is really inspiring the next generation of scientists. As a kid, I watched Apollo and “Star Trek.” I wanted to be Captain Kirk. Being part of these missions to Mars is pretty close to being Captain Kirk. It’s a very inspiring thing for me and humanity.

—Mike Deliman, senior technical staff, Wind River 


When the space agency’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) needs to run stress tests or simulations forupgrades and fixes to the OS, Wind River’s Mike Deliman gets the call. In a recent interview, Deliman, a senior member of the technical staff at Wind River, which is owned by Intel, gave a peek at the legacy technology under Curiosity’s hood and recalled the emergency call he got when an earlier Mars mission hit a software snag after liftoff.

Data usage in Asia is particularly high compared to the rest of the world and therefore they’re driven to small cells much quicker. We’ve been deploying quite a few networks now in Asia with this new type of technology. Here in Europe it’s relatively slow, but it’s beginning to get underway. There’s almost a complete reversal of what we saw in the deployment of GSM and to some extent also 3G.

Perhaps most interesting is what happens in undeveloped markets. These people don’t have old networks so they can start with a new network that has many times the capacity of the old legacy networks that the developed world has. It’s particularly well-suited to developing countries that don’t have the fixed infrastructure. In African and Latin American countries where there’s no cellular coverage at the moment, they’re being serviced by satellite.

— Chris Gilbert, CEO of Ubiquisys, which has been collaborating with Intel on “smart cells” for 3G, LTE and Wi-Fi access points that can increase processing power and storage at the network edge.

Computers that see and hear people could boost productivity and collaboration.

Until now, it has been us engaging with the machine, but now the machines have the ability to engage you. Computers have enough performance to manage a vast amount of data, a lot more than we can process in real time through our brains.

— Anil Nanduri, director of perceptual computing solutions and products at Intel.

The full story What’s Next After Touch Computing.