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Posts tagged innovators.
+ One-hundred miles east of Silicon Valley in a former tattoo parlor, members of the second-largest hackerspace in California are hoping to make a different kind of mark by advancing technology innovation in the state capital, a region known for government, clean tech and sustainable tech, but not high tech.

We are changing the world by providing community resources for education, innovation and creation. It’s all very exciting. This whole thing is like catching a big, old tsunami and saying, ‘Wow, this is huge,’ and you need to stay on. It’s scary, it’s awesome. And there’s nothing else like it in the [Sacramento] Valley.
— Eric Ullrich, a co-founder of Hacker Lab in Sacramento. 
 

Hackerspaces a Breeding Ground for Start-Ups, Entrepreneurs

One-hundred miles east of Silicon Valley in a former tattoo parlor, members of the second-largest hackerspace in California are hoping to make a different kind of mark by advancing technology innovation in the state capital, a region known for government, clean tech and sustainable tech, but not high tech.

We are changing the world by providing community resources for education, innovation and creation. It’s all very exciting. This whole thing is like catching a big, old tsunami and saying, ‘Wow, this is huge,’ and you need to stay on. It’s scary, it’s awesome. And there’s nothing else like it in the [Sacramento] Valley.

— Eric Ullrich, a co-founder of Hacker Lab in Sacramento. 

 

Hackerspaces a Breeding Ground for Start-Ups, Entrepreneurs

Posted 1 year ago. Tagged with hacker, hackerspace, sacramento, innovation, innovators, technology, software, .

An Evening with Google’s Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt (by ComputerHistory)

+ fastcompany:

An intimate portrait of the world’s most famous CEO, Mark Zuckerberg.

But the moment belonged first and foremost to Zuckerberg, who for years has had his own identity problem: “boy CEO.” Young, arrogant, and awkward—no one believed that Zuckerberg could survive the adult swim of real business, and thanks to his depiction in The Social Network, some folks will forever see him as the fatally flawed psychopathic robot nerd looking to steal your code, your personal data, your girlfriend. “I don’t think about it … much,” he once told me when I asked him how he handles all the noise, measuring his words as he always does. “I understand why people need to have these dialogues, to ask these questions. We have so much to do here, we don’t think about it if we don’t have to.”

Read on->

fastcompany:

An intimate portrait of the world’s most famous CEO, Mark Zuckerberg.

But the moment belonged first and foremost to Zuckerberg, who for years has had his own identity problem: “boy CEO.” Young, arrogant, and awkward—no one believed that Zuckerberg could survive the adult swim of real business, and thanks to his depiction in The Social Network, some folks will forever see him as the fatally flawed psychopathic robot nerd looking to steal your code, your personal data, your girlfriend. “I don’t think about it … much,” he once told me when I asked him how he handles all the noise, measuring his words as he always does. “I understand why people need to have these dialogues, to ask these questions. We have so much to do here, we don’t think about it if we don’t have to.”

Read on->

Posted 2 years ago. Tagged with innovators, technology, Facebook, CEO, .
Riding a resurgence of recognition thanks to the Hollywood movie “Red Tails,” Ben Berry spoke with Intel Free Press following his presentation and book signing at Intel’s Hillsboro, Ore. facility Wednesday. He discussed not only his days as a Tuskegee Airman during World War II, but also his work on NASA’s Apollo spacecraft and his current project designing a vertical takeoff and landing craft with his son.

As one of the first African-American aviators in the U.S. armed forces, “Flaps” Berry said he overcame adversity and racial bigotry during training and air combat to become what he is today. The 87-year-old received the Congressional Gold Medal of Honor and pursued a career in mechanical and aerospace engineering after devoting years of service to his country.

Berry’s historic military career began when he was drafted at age 18, but his passion for engineering can be traced to childhood.

"When I was about 12 years old my aunt gave me a dog-eared engineering handbook and I saw all these formulas in it I couldn’t understand," he said in an exclusive interview. "Over the years as I advanced in school, I’d look at the book often, trying to know everything that was in it, but it wasn’t until I graduated from USC when I understood the entire book. It was a personal accomplishment that began when I was a child."

Some of what he learned in that engineering manual came in handy when he worked on U.S. Army airplanes, particularly on the B-25 bomber. Preferring to fly planes instead of fixing them, Berry asked for a change of duty and got his wish.

"I always wanted to fly planes, even as a child, and I was so excited when given the chance," Berry said.

Riding a resurgence of recognition thanks to the Hollywood movie “Red Tails,” Ben Berry spoke with Intel Free Press following his presentation and book signing at Intel’s Hillsboro, Ore. facility Wednesday. He discussed not only his days as a Tuskegee Airman during World War II, but also his work on NASA’s Apollo spacecraft and his current project designing a vertical takeoff and landing craft with his son.

As one of the first African-American aviators in the U.S. armed forces, “Flaps” Berry said he overcame adversity and racial bigotry during training and air combat to become what he is today. The 87-year-old received the Congressional Gold Medal of Honor and pursued a career in mechanical and aerospace engineering after devoting years of service to his country.

Berry’s historic military career began when he was drafted at age 18, but his passion for engineering can be traced to childhood.

"When I was about 12 years old my aunt gave me a dog-eared engineering handbook and I saw all these formulas in it I couldn’t understand," he said in an exclusive interview. "Over the years as I advanced in school, I’d look at the book often, trying to know everything that was in it, but it wasn’t until I graduated from USC when I understood the entire book. It was a personal accomplishment that began when I was a child."

Some of what he learned in that engineering manual came in handy when he worked on U.S. Army airplanes, particularly on the B-25 bomber. Preferring to fly planes instead of fixing them, Berry asked for a change of duty and got his wish.

"I always wanted to fly planes, even as a child, and I was so excited when given the chance," Berry said.

Posted 2 years ago. Tagged with NASA, aerospace, science, engineering, Ben Berry, technology, innovation, innovators, .
Posted 3 years ago. Tagged with Fortune, Intel, Sean Maloney, Innovators, China, technology, leaders, rowing, inspiration, .