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Posts tagged IntelFreePress.

Mayar Naguib from Intel Cairo spoke with Intel Free Press in Barcelona, Spain on March 31, 2011, shortly after living through the revolution in Egypt. In this video, she talks about what it was like moving from a controled to a more free press environment, where more people turned to the Internet. Mayar says Facebook played an important role in connecting people and sharing information. She says that in 18 days, nearly 2 million new people went online in Egypt.

"If you were not online you were missing the news," Naguib said.

IT News Africa today reported that according to the Egyptian Ministry of Communication, there are 25 million Egyptians which are connected to the internet, but few of them have a fixed PC at home.

By implementing a system in which students can buy a large variety of different computer types, along with broadband at an affordable bundle price, a group of tech companies hopes to expand the market and bring about nationwide connectivity.

IT News Africa says the ‘connecting Egyptians with amazing technology’ initiative, led by Intel, Lenovo, B-tech, Carrefour, CompuMe, Computer Shop, Fahem, Mobile Shop, Nahdet Misr and OstazOnline is “aimed at significantly increasing PC usage and broadband penetration in Egypt by providing access to more modern technology to students at more affordable prices.”

The prices for computing are dropping relative to wages in Egypt, a trend that is expected to continue even amid the revolution last Spring. Intel Free Press reported that in 2009, a PC cost on average less than 14 days of work and is expected to be 6.6 days of work by 2014, according to data from Intel.

Photographs of science tattoos from the book “Science Ink,” by Carl Zimmer featured in the New York Times.

"I became a curator of tattoos, a scholar of science ink," said Zimmer. 

Here’s one from a collection of tattoos on Intel engineers and hipsters.

The Atlantic looks at the many inventors who paved the way for:

The number of transistors on a chip went from 2,300 in 1971 to 1 million by 1990 to 2 billion by 2010.

The story concludes:

Eureka moments do exist, and some inventors have made truly spectacular individual contributions. But we pay too much attention to a few individuals and too little attention to the many moments of meaningful innovation that come next.

One of those moments was when Federico Faggin saw the birth of the microprocessor, which he says powers our information age in the same way that the engine powered the industrial revolution. But even as computers get faster, better, cheaper and more pervasive, Faggin believes they won’t surpass the complexity and capabilities of human consciousness.

+ Answers to America’s Innovation Challenge Are in America, reports The Atlantic (photo from story):

"Indeed, if we look to nations that are gearing up to lead the pack in 2052, rather than 2012, we see that countries like Qatar and India are busy spying on these American ventures to help them make the leap. We would be well-advised to take the hint, and to push forward by drawing on what the U.S. has always done best."

But there’s “an ambition deficit” and a “lackadaisical approach to education" in this country, says MIT President Susan Hockfied during a recent Commonwealth Club talk in Silicon Valley.

"Those countries that are beating America in math and science scores in the past years are working harder and value those fields more than we do," she said.

Answers to America’s Innovation Challenge Are in America, reports The Atlantic (photo from story):

"Indeed, if we look to nations that are gearing up to lead the pack in 2052, rather than 2012, we see that countries like Qatar and India are busy spying on these American ventures to help them make the leap. We would be well-advised to take the hint, and to push forward by drawing on what the U.S. has always done best."

But there’s “an ambition deficit” and a “lackadaisical approach to education" in this country, says MIT President Susan Hockfied during a recent Commonwealth Club talk in Silicon Valley.

"Those countries that are beating America in math and science scores in the past years are working harder and value those fields more than we do," she said.

+ "Don’t just create ideas, also make products here," she said. "Buying back technologies that we invented changed our surplus into deficit. We need to have a substantial fraction of technologies that are made in America."
Despite the stinging criticism, Hockfield praised Silicon Valley for being one of the industrial wonders of the world and integral to maintaining America’s innovation lead.
"It’s where big, new ideas get transformed into products that create new markets and put people to work," she said.

"Don’t just create ideas, also make products here," she said. "Buying back technologies that we invented changed our surplus into deficit. We need to have a substantial fraction of technologies that are made in America."

Despite the stinging criticism, Hockfield praised Silicon Valley for being one of the industrial wonders of the world and integral to maintaining America’s innovation lead.

"It’s where big, new ideas get transformed into products that create new markets and put people to work," she said.

+ Risinger’s subjects were the millions upon millions of stars and solar systems and galaxies filling the night sky. The single astounding panoramic image he has created — stitched together into a seamless 5,000-megapixel shot — is riveting astronomers and sky watchers worldwide.

And it’s online. With the click of a mouse, you can zoom through the eons to peer into pale yellow gas clouds, past purple nebulae, across vast belts of stars and then into the dim light of the distant universe fading gradually to infinity.

Risinger’s subjects were the millions upon millions of stars and solar systems and galaxies filling the night sky. The single astounding panoramic image he has created — stitched together into a seamless 5,000-megapixel shot — is riveting astronomers and sky watchers worldwide.

And it’s online. With the click of a mouse, you can zoom through the eons to peer into pale yellow gas clouds, past purple nebulae, across vast belts of stars and then into the dim light of the distant universe fading gradually to infinity.

Quantum Computing Could Define the Future and Extend the Reach of Human Brainpower to Unimaginable Limits, but One Silicon Valley Legend Gives the Edge to Our Gray Matter

Designer Delves into Complexities of World’s First MicroprocessorFederico Faggin points out the intricacies on an enlarged blueprint of the Intel 4004, which he designed and became the world’s first microprocessor in 1971. (Flickr photo)
If you could ask only one person about the limits of computers past, present and future, the right person might be Federico Faggin. Forty years ago Faggin meticulously sketched the blueprint that brought to life the world’s first microprocessor, which later sparked the personal computer revolution.

Quantum Computing Could Define the Future and Extend the Reach of Human Brainpower to Unimaginable Limits, but One Silicon Valley Legend Gives the Edge to Our Gray Matter

6255229872_8c8e40f56a_b.jpg

Designer Delves into Complexities of World’s First Microprocessor
Federico Faggin points out the intricacies on an enlarged blueprint of the Intel 4004, which he designed and became the world’s first microprocessor in 1971. (Flickr photo)

If you could ask only one person about the limits of computers past, present and future, the right person might be Federico Faggin. Forty years ago Faggin meticulously sketched the blueprint that brought to life the world’s first microprocessor, which later sparked the personal computer revolution.

+
Camera: Canon EOS REBEL T1i
Aperture: f/4
Exposure: 1/60th
Focal Length: 43mm
Exif benjamintomkins:

Tablet computers that almost made it to market from Intel and Microsoft.
2000: The Intel Web Tablet let users connect to their PC and surf the Web from  anywhere in the home using Intel’s Anypoint wireless home networking solution.  It was not a stand-alone PC but an extended browsing device with some additional  applications. Why it never reached market.
2010: Microsoft’s two-screen tablet Courier. The device wasn’t intended to be a computer replacement; it was meant to  complement PCs. Courier users wouldn’t want or need a feature-rich e-mail  application such as Microsoft’s Outlook that lets them switch to conversation  views in their inbox or support offline e-mail reading and writing. The key to Courier, was its focus on content creation.  Courier was for the creative set, a gadget on which architects might begin to  sketch building plans, or writers might begin to draft documents. How MS killed it

benjamintomkins:

Tablet computers that almost made it to market from Intel and Microsoft.

2000: The Intel Web Tablet let users connect to their PC and surf the Web from anywhere in the home using Intel’s Anypoint wireless home networking solution. It was not a stand-alone PC but an extended browsing device with some additional applications. Why it never reached market.

2010: Microsoft’s two-screen tablet Courier. The device wasn’t intended to be a computer replacement; it was meant to complement PCs. Courier users wouldn’t want or need a feature-rich e-mail application such as Microsoft’s Outlook that lets them switch to conversation views in their inbox or support offline e-mail reading and writing. The key to Courier, was its focus on content creation. Courier was for the creative set, a gadget on which architects might begin to sketch building plans, or writers might begin to draft documents. How MS killed it

Posted 2 years ago. Tagged with Tablet, Intel, iPad, Microsoft, IntelFreePress, Intel Free Press, Fail, .
tumblrbot:

WORK IT, ROBOT


Here’s a robot maker, a.k.a modern day Da Vinci Matt Bunting, on how he made his creepy, cute spider-like hexapod dance to the music.

tumblrbot:

WORK IT, ROBOT

Here’s a robot maker, a.k.a modern day Da Vinci Matt Bunting, on how he made his creepy, cute spider-like hexapod dance to the music.

Posted 2 years ago. Tagged with robot, hexapod, Matt Bunting, IntelFreePress, .
+ Words of wisdom from Puss: Cat people are crazy! According to The Wall Street Journal, "Puss in Boots" Bests Box Office in debut weekend. Here’s a look at a creative code warrior's day working inside DreamWorks.

Words of wisdom from Puss: Cat people are crazy! According to The Wall Street Journal, "Puss in Boots" Bests Box Office in debut weekend. Here’s a look at a creative code warrior's day working inside DreamWorks.

+ Solar car design powered by high performance computing as Cambridge University hits World Solar Challenge, Australia next week.

Solar car design powered by high performance computing as Cambridge University hits World Solar Challenge, Australia next week.

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Camera: iPhone 4
Aperture: f/2.8
Exposure: 1/15th
Focal Length: 3mm
Exif This is our up-close photo of the experimental Intel chip, something Wired’s Gadget Lab reports is an example of Future of CPU Efficiency.

This is our up-close photo of the experimental Intel chip, something Wired’s Gadget Lab reports is an example of Future of CPU Efficiency.

+ Animusic did a crazy musical animation called Pipe Dream several years ago. This year it was turned into reality: a paintball orchestra led by seven semiconductors.

Animusic did a crazy musical animation called Pipe Dream several years ago. This year it was turned into reality: a paintball orchestra led by seven semiconductors.

Salon explores the price of making a submarine and the recreational adventures of submariners in You-Bout, Can You Buy Your Own Submarine?
It’s something that that’s been going on for decades, all his live even, for this Intel engineer who used his homemade submarine to find 150-year-old sunken treasure off the coast of California.

Salon explores the price of making a submarine and the recreational adventures of submariners in You-Bout, Can You Buy Your Own Submarine?

It’s something that that’s been going on for decades, all his live even, for this Intel engineer who used his homemade submarine to find 150-year-old sunken treasure off the coast of California.

Researchers such as Intel’s David Ginsberg are digging deep into the recesses of the human psyche to learn how technology can be created that connects the emotional and rational parts of the human brain.