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Posts tagged Facebook.


When we opened AT&T Park, there were a number of fans that would actually use their cell phone to talk. There was almost this little joke of, “You’re not supposed to be on your cell phone at a sporting event.” Then technology evolved and we saw more people texting. Now, because almost everybody carries a mobile device with them, whether it’s a phone or a tablet, we see a lot more shared experiences. They want to be a part of the action, but they also want to share that with others.

— Bryan Srabian, San Francisco Giants’ director of social media

Full story Giants Engage Fans with Facebook, Twitter

The middle class is driving technology growth in Indonesia, a country that leads most nations with the most participants on top social networking and media sites like Facebook and Twitter, according to Gregory Bryant, general manager of the Asia-Pacific region for Intel corporation.

Turkey’s growing middle class is finding technology to be more affordable and more essential in their daily lives. According to data from Intel, people living in Eastern Europe paid the equivalent of nearly 48 weeks of work for a new PC in 1995. In 2010, that dropped to 5 weeks and a new PC in 2014 is expected to cost just more than the equivalent of 2 weeks of work. With more people able to afford a PC in Turkey, sales have grown from 1 million units in 2003 to 5.5 million units in 2011, and Aydin expects to see 13.8 million units sell in 2015.

Posted 1 year ago. Tagged with Turkey, Technology, Facebook, Twitter, IDC, Intel, Emerging Markets, Economy, .
+ fastcompany:

An intimate portrait of the world’s most famous CEO, Mark Zuckerberg.

But the moment belonged first and foremost to Zuckerberg, who for years has had his own identity problem: “boy CEO.” Young, arrogant, and awkward—no one believed that Zuckerberg could survive the adult swim of real business, and thanks to his depiction in The Social Network, some folks will forever see him as the fatally flawed psychopathic robot nerd looking to steal your code, your personal data, your girlfriend. “I don’t think about it … much,” he once told me when I asked him how he handles all the noise, measuring his words as he always does. “I understand why people need to have these dialogues, to ask these questions. We have so much to do here, we don’t think about it if we don’t have to.”

Read on->

fastcompany:

An intimate portrait of the world’s most famous CEO, Mark Zuckerberg.

But the moment belonged first and foremost to Zuckerberg, who for years has had his own identity problem: “boy CEO.” Young, arrogant, and awkward—no one believed that Zuckerberg could survive the adult swim of real business, and thanks to his depiction in The Social Network, some folks will forever see him as the fatally flawed psychopathic robot nerd looking to steal your code, your personal data, your girlfriend. “I don’t think about it … much,” he once told me when I asked him how he handles all the noise, measuring his words as he always does. “I understand why people need to have these dialogues, to ask these questions. We have so much to do here, we don’t think about it if we don’t have to.”

Read on->

Posted 2 years ago. Tagged with innovators, technology, Facebook, CEO, .

Today, The Commonwealth Club’s Inforum hosted a call with Nour Ahmadein, an Egyptian activist, in conversation with Caitlin McGrath, a masters in Middle East and Islamic Studies and Fellow at the Commonwealth Club. When asked if he would call last year’s uprising in Egypt a Facebook Revolution, Ahmadein said:

No, it was a people revolution. Facebook was utilized to organize people. It was a communications tool. We couldn’t have organized everyone the way we did without Facebook. That’s the most effective use of Facebook.

Above is a video recorded about a month after the uprising with Mayar Naguib from Intel Cairo. She talks about her experience living through the revolution in Egypt. She talks about what it was like moving from a controlled to a more free press environment, where more people turned to the Internet. Mayar says Facebook played an important role in connecting people and sharing information. She says that in 18 days, nearly 2 million new people went online in Egypt. “If you were not online you were missing the news,” she said.

Posted 2 years ago. Tagged with Egypt, Technology, Facebook, .

Facebook Apps: Highlights of the 60 New Integrated Applications
If you enjoy using Spotify or Foursquare on Facebook, imagine having the same integration with a bevy of other apps. Now you can share more than just your location, music tastes and which story you enjoyed reading on the Washington Post that day using Social Reader.

A look at Facebook’s enormous data center that brings these experiences to people’s lives. 

Posted 2 years ago. Tagged with Facebook, technology, data center, big data, data, innovation, applications, .
+ Facebook engineer Joshua Crass holds up a server board he and his team installed at the new data center built last year (2011) in the remote desert town of Prineville, Ore., 150 miles east of Portland. The exact number of dual-socket boards is proprietary, but it’s “many tens of thousands.” 
More photos in this story: A Peak Inside Facebook’s Oregon Data Center.

Facebook engineer Joshua Crass holds up a server board he and his team installed at the new data center built last year (2011) in the remote desert town of Prineville, Ore., 150 miles east of Portland. The exact number of dual-socket boards is proprietary, but it’s “many tens of thousands.” 

More photos in this story: A Peak Inside Facebook’s Oregon Data Center.

Posted 2 years ago. Tagged with data, data center, technology, tech, Facebook, Oregon, Big data, servers, .
It’s all about me is Fast Company’s look at putting people into the branded marketing experience,  a trend epitomized by Museum of Me, which pulls information from your Facebook page to create a virtual museum of your digital life. Photos, videos and friends are presented as pieces of art, displayed randomly as if in a museum or art gallery.

It’s all about me is Fast Company’s look at putting people into the branded marketing experience,  a trend epitomized by Museum of Me, which pulls information from your Facebook page to create a virtual museum of your digital life. Photos, videos and friends are presented as pieces of art, displayed randomly as if in a museum or art gallery.


Posted 2 years ago. Tagged with Facebook, Internet, art, marketing, brands, Museum of Me, Coke, .

"Ultimately, the Museum of Me taps into one’s narcissism and private experiences in an intensely social and networked world," said Jayant Murty, the director of Intel’s brand strategy in Asia

Like any new and successful idea, the concept for The Museum of Me sprang from humble beginnings. The idea began with rough sketches drawn on cocktail napkins.

The Museum of Me was created by an Intel marketing team in Hong Kong working with a boutique advertising agency in Japan, and it’s reportedly become one of the top 12 most popular museums in the world judging by the numbers.

Here’s the Making of Me back story.